Harvest Festival

As I sit bundled up under sweaters and knitted throws, looking out on a cold, grey sky, I’m calling up a warmer day last month when we journeyed out with our mates to experience the Autumn Harvest Festival at Rouse Hill House and Farm. The house and farm are part of Sydney Living Museums, a group of historic structures and gardens, such as Vaucluse House that I wrote about last year.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (2 of 27)I’m afraid I went with notions of the familiar American harvest festival, expecting big orange pumpkins, some hot apple cider, and maybe a hayride.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (1 of 27)We did get to eat scones with jam and fresh cream while sitting on hay bales! These were proper scones, not the fry bread that Utahns try to pass off as scones.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (6 of 27)And there was some beautiful harvest bounty.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (7 of 27)I sought out orange where I could find it. (over in the corner. the carrots)

Rouse Hill House and Farm (1 of 4)This looks more like spring! But I still have a lot to learn about planting and growing here.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (9 of 27)There were stalls with lots of yummy things to eat. Eat Me Chutneys rescues “unsold, wonky and bruised produce and convert it into epic chutneys.” We got some of the tamarind and fig. It was indeed epic!

Rouse Hill House and Farm (3 of 4)I found myself enchanted by the lovely displays. I’m a sucker for things in jars. So is my husband. Several jars followed us home.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (4 of 27)Things in beakers also win me over!

Rouse Hill House and Farm (11 of 27)I didn’t try Loli’s Organic Nut Butters, but they looked delicious.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (4 of 4)I can not tell you how badly I wanted to ring this bell in front of the old schoolhouse. If they hadn’t put that sign there, I wouldn’t have even considered it.

Rouse Hill House old photo (1 of 1)Rouse Hill House was constructed in the early 1800s. Six generations of the family lived there up until the late 1990s when it was opened as a museum.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (18 of 27)Today, the house on the hill is abuzz with visitors.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (21 of 27)The house and farm is built on the site of the Battle of Vinegar Hill, a convict uprising in 1804, led by Irish political prisoners and named for the battle that took place in Ireland in 1798 between the British Redcoats and Irish rebels. It was sobering to look out on the quiet open space and think of the strife that unraveled there so long ago.

Rouse Hill House and Farm (22 of 27)I find it quite thrilling to travel down these old roads to find the history there. There are many more Sydney Living Museum sites I hope to visit, including homes, a barracks, the mint, and more. I’ve learned that in some they have candle-lit tours available! Now that sounds fun!

 

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